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Cassini examines the moons of Saturn


Here are two new shots of the probe arrived in orbit of the sixth planet of the solar system in 2004. In the images are the moon Janus, which shares its orbit with Epimetheus (for years a mystery to scientists) and the moon Titan, the most studied by experts.

The probe NASA/ESA/ASI Cassini continues to observe Saturn and its moons and always sends to Earth extraordinary images of the sixth planet of the solar system in order of distance from the Sun since 2004, i.e. since the probe entered the orbit of Saturn, many valuable data have been sent to Earth. An example are these two new images of Titan and Janus, two of Saturn’s moons among the most studied by astronomers.

Cassini examines the moons of Saturn

 Source: NASA/ESA/ASI Cassini

 The moon Janus, a moon of Saturn, also known as Saturn X, discovered by Audouin Dollfus December 15, 1966. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

The camera mounted on Cassini photographed the small and irregular moon Janus, many also called Saturn X, surrounded by darkness and by the immensity of the sky. The moon (with a diameter of about 179 km) is particular because it shares its orbit with other natural satellite Epimetheus: the two moons, in fact, change their orbital position every 4 years.

Cassini examines the moons of Saturn 2

 Source: NASA/ESA/ASI Cassini

 The moon Titan is the largest natural satellite of the planet Saturn and one of the most massive rocky bodies of the solar system. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

In this photo where you can see the face of Janus facing Saturn, was taken on September 10, 2013, from a distance of about 1 million kilometers. The moon was discovered in 1966, but its existence was confirmed by Voyager 1 on March 1, 1980.

Extensive collection of images of the Titan moon has been supplemented by a new one. This is the largest natural satellite of Saturn and also the second largest of the Solar System. In this picture you see a haze in the north and the south polar vortex in the moon that has a diameter of 5.150 km and this is the face that is turned toward Saturn.

The image was taken on August 20 of last year with a special sensitive filter to wavelengths of near-infrared, from a distance of 2.5 kilometers. Titan was discovered March 25, 1655 just after the Dutch astronomer Christiaan Huygens, which inspired the name of the mission. The next Titan flyby will be in a  few days, on February 2.

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