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A black hole of miser gas


It seems to be like that for the black hole in the cluster of galaxies RX J1532.9 3021. It would seem that in fact, it takes everything for itself, blocking the birth of thousands of billions of stars. It is what has been shown in a study based on satellite data from Hubble and Chandra and appeared in the Astrophysical Journal in November 2013.

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A composite image (X-ray and optical) where the two telescopes Chandra and Hubble show the black hole at the center of the cluster of galaxies RX J1532.9 3021. Credit: Observations in the X-ray: NASA / CXC / Stanford / J.Hlavacek – Larrondo et al, in the optical observations: NASA / ESA / STScI / M.Postman & CLASH team

Miser gas. It seems that the black hole in the cluster of galaxies RX J1532.9 3021 is besieged by miser gas. It would, in fact, take everything for itself, blocking the birth of thousands of billions of stars. It is what has been shown in a study based on satellite data from Hubble and Chandra and appeared in the Astrophysical Journal in November 2013.

The scene of the “crime” is located about 3.9 billion light years from Earth, and shows an extreme phenomenon that has been noticed in other galaxies, but on smaller scales.

According to scientists from the Chandra Observatory “the large amount of hot gas near the center of the cluster is an enigma.” The hot gas that emits X-rays should cool down and the gas of higher density at the center of the cluster should cool down even faster. The pressure in this central region where the gas is colder than it should be, it should go down, and it may fall toward the galaxy’s gas farther, thus forming trillions of stars along the way.

However, in this case, astronomers have found no evidence of this expected star formation at the center of the cluster.

What is then blocking the stars? According to data from Chandra and the National Science Foundation Karl G. Jansky, Very Large Array, he guilty party could be the supersonic jets emitted by the black hole in the central galaxy of storage pushing out the gas present in the area, forming cavities on both sides of the galaxy. These cavities, among other things, are immense: 100,000 light years in diameter each, which makes them less big as the Milky Way (The Milky Way is a disk about 120000 light years).

The big question is: where does this power come from? Could it be that the black hole is ultramassive (ten billion times the mass of the Sun) and therefore would have a mass that emit jets without eating itself and produce radiation. Alternatively, the black hole could be smaller (one billion times the mass of the Sun), but it would rotate more quickly, which would enable it to make such powerful jets.

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